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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 95-100

Effect of different household processing on nutritional and anti-nutritional factors in Vigna aconitifolia and Sorghum bicolour (L.) Moench seeds and their product development


1 Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Banasthali University, Banasthali, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Pharmacy, Banasthali University, Banasthali, Rajasthan, India

Date of Web Publication4-Aug-2015

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Swapnil Sharma
Department of Pharmacy, Banasthali University, Banasthali - 304 022, Rajasthan
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2278-019X.151809

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  Abstract 

Aim: This study involves the effect of different household processing on nutritional and anti-nutritional factors in moth bean (Vigna aconitifolia) and Sorghum (Sorghum bicolour (L.) Moench) seeds and with their product development.
Methods: This study involves the effect of different homemade processing of moth and Sorghum on proximate composition and anti-nutritional factors and further development of certain products using processed moth and Sorghum flours.
Results: During the process of soaking, the moisture content, and vitamin C contents were found to be increased; with a significant decrease in ash content, fat content, crude fiber content, protein content in both samples (except iron content). In moth bean, 72 h germination process resulted in a decrease in moisture content, fat content, crude fiber content, with an increase in ash content, protein content, iron content, and vitamin C contents whereas in Sorgum all the contents were decreased except moisture content, and vitamin C contents. Ash content, protein content, iron content and vitamin C content with a significant decrease in moisture content, fat content, and fiber content. After processing, the anti-nutritional factors were also decreased in both samples. The modified recipes with the processed moth bean, Sorghum, and blended flours were developed as thalpeeth and papri-chat and acceptability studies of products were carried out and compared with standard. It was found that all samples were acceptable to panel members making then quality for the potential usage as delivery vehicles for use gluten allergy, scurvy, and malnourished children.
Conclusion: We can conclude that moth bean and Sorghum to our diet will help to improve the nutritional profile at low cost.

Keywords: Anti-nutrients, digestibility, germination, tannins


How to cite this article:
Singh E, Jain PK, Sharma S. Effect of different household processing on nutritional and anti-nutritional factors in Vigna aconitifolia and Sorghum bicolour (L.) Moench seeds and their product development. J Med Nutr Nutraceut 2015;4:95-100

How to cite this URL:
Singh E, Jain PK, Sharma S. Effect of different household processing on nutritional and anti-nutritional factors in Vigna aconitifolia and Sorghum bicolour (L.) Moench seeds and their product development. J Med Nutr Nutraceut [serial online] 2015 [cited 2018 Dec 9];4:95-100. Available from: http://www.jmnn.org/text.asp?2015/4/2/95/151809


  Introduction Top


The supplements of cereals with the high protein legumes are considered to be one of the best preventable measures for the protein energy malnutrition. [1] Pulses are a rich source of protein and constitute important item of diets of the population of Asia and they are suitable protein supplements to cereals and also contain good quality of vitamins and nutrients. [2]

Moth bean is commonly grown in arid areas of India and is consumed either as such after cooking or after germination and cooking. Moth bean is the unexploited legumes of the tropics and subtropics grown mostly under dry-land agriculture. The chemical composition is comparable with commonly cultivated legume. Like other legume this legume is deficient in methionine and tryptophan. [3],[4]

Sorghum and millet are significant contributes to protein and energy requirement for millions of people, especially for the poor person in Africa and Asia. Sorghum is adapted to a wide range of ecological condition and can be grown under unfavorable condition because it is tolerate to adverse condition such as hot and dry also in areas of high rainfall, water logging drought, poor fertility, and salinity soil. [5]

Grain Sorghum (Sorghum bicolour (L.) Moench) form a stale diet for poorer masses of the people in many countries. [6] Like other plant proteins, Sorghum protein quality is poor. Inadequate intake of good quality proteins is an important factor responsible for the widespread prevalence of protein energy malnutrition. Poor nutritional quality of grain Sorghum has been attributed to the low levels of certain essential amino acids especially lysine, threonine and tryptophan and excessive content of leucine. The grain Sorghum also contain phenolic compounds namely tannins, which decrease the protein utilization. [7],[8]

The nutritive value of grain legumes depends primarily on their nutrient and the presence or absence of anti-nutrient and toxic factors. [9] Some simple and inexpensive processing technique, such as soaking, germination, and cooking are highly efficient for the reduction of anti-nutritional factors and for improving its organoleptic quality. [10]

The unique nutritional composition of moth bean and Sorghum will make a great scope to meet the nutritional requirement of malnourished people of our country. By taking this view, the present study was undertaken.


  Objectives of the Study Top


  • To undertake processing of moth bean and Sorghum by soaking and germination, respectively
  • To assess the proximate composition and anti-nutritional factors of processed moth bean, Sorghum, and blended flour
  • To develop commonly consumed products based on processed flours
  • To evaluate organoleptic acceptability of processed moth bean and Sorghum blended flour based products by nine-point hedonic scale.



  Methods Top


The methodological aspects of the study have been discussed as under

Phase - I

Phase I consisted of processing of moth bean and Sorghum. Both undergo for 10 h soaking process and germination process for 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h, respectively.

Procurement of materials

Moth bean and Sorghum were obtained in bulk from local market of Shri Ganganagar (Raj) and were cleaned, dried, and stored safely in container.

Processing of moth bean and Sorghum

Processing of both, that is, soaking and germination (24, 48, 72 h individually) greatly enhance the nutritive values of grains and improve the shelf life. Selection of the best stage of both was carried out based on highest vitamin C content. Then moth bean and Sorghum flour as well as blended were prepared.

Phase - II

Analysis of nutritional composition of moth bean and Sorghum flours and blended flours: This part of the study focused on nutrient estimation of flours. All sample of row and processed were analyzed for nutrient given below:

Moisture and ash by drying method, [11] fat content by Soxhlet method, crude fiber by acid and alkali treatment, [12] protein content by estimate nitrogen content, [11] vitamin C, [13] and iron by Wong's method. [14]

Analysis of anti-nutrients of moth bean and Sorghum flours and blended flours: Tannins [15] and phytic acid [16] were estimated.

Phase - III

Product development and sensory evaluation

Selection and standardization of recipes

In order to prepare recipes for this study, homebased recipes were selected, which could be enriched suitably to meet the objective of this experimentation. The criteria of selection were: Easy availability of ingredients, commonly consumed by local people.

Keeping all these considerations in mind, processed moth bean and Sorghum flours were used to prepare value added products replaced with refined flour. Two products viz., thalpeeth and papdi chat were prepared in food science laboratory of Food Science and Nutrition Department, Banasthali University. These recipes first standardized and then replaced with refined flour in the products, after that sensory evaluation was done. Selection of panel members was carried out by triangle difference test and sensory evaluation was done by nine-point hedonic scale.

Phase - IV

For analysis and interpretation of data different statistical methods mean, standard deviation, and Student's t-test were used.


  Result Top


  • The result would be discussed under the following heads:
  • Nutrient analysis of moth bean and Sorghum flour and blended flour
  • Anti-nutritional factor analysis of blended flour
  • Sensory evaluation of food products by nine-point hedonic scale.


Effect of different processing on moisture content

As predict in [Table 1], the moisture content of unprocessed moth bean and Sorghum were 10.30 and 9.8 g/100 g, respectively. After soaking the moisture content in the individual flours were 12.9, 11.44 g/100 g, respectively. As data indicated that the moisture content was found to be increased in both soaked samples. Whereas in 24, 48, and 72 h germinated moth bean flours had 12.6, 9.3, and 9.9 g/100 g moisture content, respectively. The moisture content was decreased significantly in moth bean. Whereas the moisture content in 24, 48, and 72 h in germinated Sorghum increased to 11.2, 10.2, and 10.7 g/100 g, respectively. The moisture content of Sorghum in all three germination period differed significantly from each other.
Table 1: Effect of different processing on the nutritional composition of moth bean and Sorghum


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The increase in moisture content was due to changes resulting from the uptake of water during soaking. Low moisture content was observed in germinated flour due to drying grain after germination.

Effect of different processing on ash content

The samples were analyzed for their mineral ash content, that is, the total amount of mineral they contained. This help to evaluate the overall quality of the sample in term of their mineral composition and centrifugation.

Data given on [Table 1] showed that unprocessed moth bean and Sorghum content were 3.0, 1.9 g/100 g, respectively. After soaking the ash content were decreased in both moth bean and Sorghum that were 2.8 and 1.7 g/100 g, respectively. After germination, the ash content in moth bean was increased 2.8, 2.84, and 3.12 g/100 g with the increased germination period. Whereas in Sorghum the ash content were 1.82, 1.85 g/100 g on all two stages of germination 24 and 48 h and it was decreased significantly on germination for 72 h.

An increase in ash content is considered to be apparently caused by the loss of starch, while a decrease can be attributed to leaching losses during soaking and rinsing. [17],[18],[19]

Effect of different processing on fat content

Data given on [Table 1] indicated the fat content of unprocessed moth bean and Sorghum were 2.8, 4.66 g/100 g, respectively. This was reduced to 1.5, 3.34 g/100 g, respectively during the soaking process. The fat content in moth bean decreased 2.2, 1.99, 1.35 g/100 g significantly with the increased germination period at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. The trend for changes in fat content of germinated Sorghum flours had 3.28, 3.18, and 3.65 g/100 g, respectively in all 24, 48, and 72 h period of germination. The fat content in germinated Sorghum flours was significantly decreased than standard in all three germination period.

The similar result observed by Vale et al. [20] The decrease in fat in moth bean during germination may be due to increased activity of lipase. [4] This can be attributed high lipolytic enzyme activity which breakdown the triglyceride to similar fatty acids especially with soaked and germinated. [21] The reduction in fat content observed during germination a reduction in the energy value implies of all test similar result was obtained by the Vasishtha and Srivastava. [22]

Effect of different processing on crude fiber content

Data given on [Table 1] indicated that the crude fiber content in unprocessed/standard moth bean and Sorghum were 4.34, 1.79 g/100 g, respectively and after soaking treatment crude fiber were decreased 4.2, 1.62 g/100 g, respectively. After germination fiber content significantly decreased in the samples, the moth bean and Sorghum.

Similar result had been reported by other workers. [19],[22] Cell wall degradation during the sprouting lowers crude fiber content. [23]

Effect of different processing on protein content

As dedicated in [Table 1] that protein content of unprocessed moth bean and Sorghum were 23.78, 12.56 g/100 g, respectively. Soaking of grains caused significant decreased in protein content in both moth bean and Sorghum 21.34, 10.54 g/100 g, respectively. Then subsequent germination for 24, 48, and 72 h caused significant increase in protein content on moth bean 24.10, 24.45, and 24.95 g/100 g, respectively. Whereas, in Sorghum seed with 24, 48, and 72 h germination had decreased 11.60, 10.32, and 10.20 g/100 g, respectively when compared to standard.

Loss of dry weight (carbohydrates) during sprouting may show apparent increases in protein, while loss of low molecular weight nitrogenous compounds during soaking and rinsing of grains cause a decrease in crude protein on sprouting. [17] Similar finding were reported by Kylen and McReady. [24] Who attribute the increase to protein synthesis at the time of sprouting alfalfa, lentil, mung beans, and soybeans. It was also possible that the increase in protein was due to changes resulting from the uptake of water during germination.

Effect of different processing on iron content

Iron content in unprocessed moth bean and Sorghum were 8.9 mg, 4.55 mg/100 g, respectively as shown in [Table 1]. After soaking the iron content was increased in moth bean (10.7 mg/100 g) but decrease in Sorghum up to (3.5 mg/100 g) when compare to unprocessed. Similarly, germination for 24, 48, and 72 h had increase in moth bean 9.5, 10.1, and 10.7 mg/100 g, whereas decreased in Sorghum with increased in germination period.

The decrease in iron content observed with a corresponding increase in sprouting period is attributed to leaching losses. [17]

Effect of different processing on vitamin C content

The vitamin C content of unprocessed moth bean was 1.8 mg/100 g and in Sorghum was 0.6 mg/100 g as shown in [Table 1]. After soaking there were slightly increase in values 3.8, 1.2 mg/100 g in moth bean and Sorghum, respectively. The increase value by germination was in both. In moth bean 11, 11.8, and 8.5 mg/100 g with respect to increasing germination period. Same as with Sorghum value 1, 2, 2.8 mg/100 g content were increased.

The ascorbic acid has been found to increase continuously and significantly with progressive sprouting. [20] The germination of pulses increases its nutritional contents. The germination pulses have high vitamin C content, other vitamins, and folic acid. [25]

The nutritional composition of blended flour

Germination process significantly influenced the nutrient content; as shown in [Table 2]. Most of the nutrients were slightly decreased, e.g. fat content, crude fiber, iron content, and protein content with an increase in moisture and ash and vitamin C content.
Table 2: Effect of germination processing on the nutritional composition of blended flour


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Germination process remarkably decreased the anti-nutritional factors in both samples as shown in [Table 3]. The tannin content in unprocessed blended flour had 625 mg/100 g and the phytic content in unprocessed blended flour had found 855 mg/100 g. In processed blended flour, the tannin and phytic acid were found 315 mg/100 g and 715 mg/100 g, respectively. Loss of tannin germination may be due to enzymatic degradation. [26] Similarly, Deosthale [27] the reason assigned for this reduction was a breakdown of tannins content during germination. The breakdown of phytic acid during germination could be attributable to an increase in the activity of endogenous phytate as reported for faba bean cultivars. [28]
Table 3: Effect of processing on the anti-nutritional factors of blended flour


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Nielsen et al., [29] Reddy et al. [30] also observed that food processing such as soaking and germination of whole cereals and legumes activate the endogenous plant phytases as well as bacterial phytates. These reduce the hexaform of phytic acid into lower form having lower acids and B-complex vitamins. [31]

As depicted in [Table 4], thalpeeth was made by tally replaced with processed moth bean flour, Sorghum flour, and blended flour. Data ranged from 6.85 ± 0.87 to 8.35 ± 0.58 for all attributes of sensory appearance, color, flavor, aftertaste, texture, and overall acceptability. In all the test samples, the sample B (Sorghum flour) was more acceptable as compared to sample A and C.
Table 4: Acceptability evaluation of thalpeeth and papri-chat replaced with processed moth bean and Sorghum flours


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As shown in [Table 4], papri chat was made by totally replaced with processed moth bean flour, Sorghum flour, and blended flour. The score between 7.45 ± 1.1 and 8.65 ± 0.59 for all attributes of sensory appearance, color, flavor, after taste, texture, and overall acceptability. Data depicted that according to overall acceptability sample B was more acceptable as compared to the standard sample. The samples A and C were also found to be similarly acceptable. They have slightly differed from each other thus all the test samples of papri chat were equally as good as standard.


  Discussion Top


The problem of food and nutrition security is of paramount importance in India. The diet consumed by a large majority of the population in India are lacking in number of dietary essentials resulting in widespread prevalence of malnutrition. Pulses are relatively cheaper sources of protein than milk, cheese, meat, fish, almonds and cashew, etc., hence, valuable for the people who belongs lower income groups. The unique nutritional composition of moth bean and Sorghum will make a great scope to meet the nutritional requirement of malnourished and poor people of our country. As we know that moth bean rich in lysine amino acid and Sorghum is rich in methionine thus, they both fulfill each other requirement when we use these in combination.

The underutilized food grains moth bean and Sorghum have a vast scope for not only supporting the commercially grown crops by reducing pressure on their availability, but they are cheap source of nutrients and can be raised at low management cost. However, these coarse grains also contain anti-nutritional factors such as phytate and tannins, which due to their iron binding effect worsen the situation of widespread prevalent iron deficiency anemia. Hence, it is recommend that for proper utilization of cereals and pulses. It is quite possible to get rid of these anti-nutritional factors and improve the bioavailability by using simple different domestic methods like soaking and germination have been proved to be beneficial for enhancing the nutritive value of moth bean and Sorghum.


  Conclusion Top


The present investigation reveals that soaking and germination process not only save the time, energy and fuel consumption, but also enhances the nutritional quality in raw materials (moth bean and Sorghum seeds) just before the development of food products. These processes also significantly reduce the anti-nutritional components in the same. Therefore, moth bean and Sorghum can be used as singly or in combination food products; therefore, considered to be one of the best preventable measures for disorders of protein malnutrition.

 
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    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3], [Table 4]



 

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